All Things Upwork

Success Stories: William Bridges of CogWise Software

August 20, 2008 by

CogWise Software specializes in building Ruby on Rails web applications. Based in Nashville, TN, USA, the company was founded in January 2007 and started hiring oDesk providers last November. The company relies on oDesk to simplify administration and to provide the bulk of its manpower–with only two in-house employees, it has 12 to 15 oDesk providers working on projects at any time. The company had been known as BluePaw Software, but was rebranded as CogWise just this week. CEO William Bridges says the new company is a fresh partnership with an oDesk provider, and the time was right for a new start. “CogWise is also about building long-term, mutually beneficial relationships with clients and building our own internal software projects that my partner and I have thought of.” Q:  Do you have a small group of providers you work with regularly, or do you tend to seek new providers to suit each individual project? A:  A little of both. As we’ve grown, we’ve needed more developers. We actually look in the oDesk marketplace and outside, but we always have new developers sign up for an oDesk account, because it makes things a lot easier to manage. Our strategy is to have two or three small teams and some specialists for technology outside our core interest. Q:  How do you manage your providers? What have you learned about setting timelines, specifying deliverables or managing communication that’s unique to the remote worker relationship? A:  We use a project management software package called RedMine to foster communication. We usually have one lead developer who sets up tickets, milestones, and the deliverable schedule, and then the other programmers help execute that vision. Remote situations can be difficult and rewarding … Read Full Article

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Make Money as a Customer Service Expert

August 20, 2008 by

Customer support representative, as a discrete job or as one facet of the "virtual assistant" position, is a great opportunity for a provider with strong interpersonal skills and a natural ability to solve problems. But it can be hard to stand out among applicants for a job involving human language and "common" interpersonal skills. Review your profile: Spelling and grammar mistakes can kill your chances. You’re asking to represent someone’s business to the world. Mention "customer support" in your skills list or the title. Make sure your profile reflects your interest in the job. Take the right tests. Placing highly in oDesk’s Call Center Skills Test and our Email Etiquette Test demonstrates your skills and show you’ve taken time to establish your abilities–you’re not just answering this job post because, "What the heck, I’ve got a phone …" Nail the interview: Be professional, positive and polite. The buyer is thinking, "This is the voice my customers will hear. This is the attitude my customers will encounter." Ask smart questions. A customer support person or versatile virtual assistant is a problem solver who deftly cuts to the heart of a matter to come up with a quick, appealing solution. Ask about the kinds of questions callers will bring, the tools and authority you’ll have to solve them, the training you’ll get and the metrics that will provide feedback on your efforts. Can you listen in on a few calls, live or prerecorded? Treat the the buyer like a customer. When the interview finishes, ask whether there’s anything else you can do for the buyer right now, and wish her a good day–leave her feeling the way she wants her customers to feel. Do the job: Keep a … Read Full Article

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Outsource Customer Support and Save Money

August 20, 2008 by

Outsourcing customer support can be nerve-wracking. If you hire someone to build a website but don’t like the result, you’re out some time and money. Failures in customer support will cost you clients. Yet, if your in-house resources are drawn too thin, you can’t do a good job of managing your customers, either. There are reliable, responsible people working from home, and the cost savings over hiring and housing office staff are obvious–there’s a reason it’s a growing trend. JetBlue has thousands of people fielding customer calls from their homes, and the airline consistently ranks high in customer satisfaction. So it can be done. The question is, how do you do it right? Profile Details: Scan feedback for comments that praise not just work product, but interaction: “a joy to work with,” “an excellent communicator,” “very responsive.” Also look for test scores; oDesk offers certification in email etiquette and call-center skills. Anyone serious about the job will have taken the tests and scored well. Enjoy the Interview: The best customer service people are extremely competent and genuinely dedicated to helping you out. They’re sympathetic and friendly, but always professional, not chatty. When you interview your candidates, make sure they’re giving you the vibe you want your customers to get. Asset Allocation: Does the candidate have the time to commit to the schedule you need? Does she have the necessary technology and a quiet place to use it? Does she demonstrate the problem-solving skills the job requires? Role-play: Practice a few scenarios to see how your top candidates perform. Can your prospective hire listen in on a few well-handled calls? You should definitely monitor the first few calls after you hire her and provide very specific feedback. Read Full Article

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Hide unwanted teams

August 19, 2008 by

Yes, you can hide a team Owners can now hide teams. Hiding a team makes it disappear from your team room and all pages with a team selector bar — no more scrolling through a list of inactive teams! A hidden team is not deleted from the system. We find hide to be more useful than delete because you can toggle the show/hide setting whenever you need to on the new My Teams page. Please note that you cannot hide a team if it has an active assignment, or any team members (besides yourself). You may remove additional team members such as managers and ACs in your Roster. Read Full Article

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Security Question and SMS Notifications

July 31, 2008 by

User security is a top priority here at oDesk. In addition to entering a password all users must now also answer a security question to perform sensitive operations. We also added an option to receive vital notifications via SMS.   Why do I need a security question? Users log in with their user ID and password to use most of our online and software features. Due to concerns about fraud and unauthorized access to financial information we’ve added an additional level of security to protect users’ accounts. The security question helps prevent unauthorized access if a user’s password is stolen. Read more about the security question in the help pages. How do I set my security question? The next time you access your My oDesk page you will be prompted to create a security question. How do I choose a security question? The security question and its answer should be intuitive to you and easy to remember. Having said that, make sure to select a question to which the answer is difficult to guess. What is a security (SMS) email notification? Many cellular phones come equipped with SMS (text messaging) capabilities. If you choose this option we will immediately send a notifications to your cell phone of changes made to your account. Why should I add a security (SMS) email address? We strongly suggest that you use a security (SMS) email address that forwards to a cell phone. That way you can be notified immediately of changes to secure settings of your account, even if you’re away from your computer. In the event of unauthorized account access, the sooner you know there’s a problem, the better. What if I don’t normally receive email on my cell phone? Your phone probably has the … Read Full Article

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Improvements to Ending Candidacies

July 30, 2008 by

We have made some changes to how oDesk users can manage their candidacies. Specifically we’ve consolidated and worthsmithed the pre-populated list of reasons for Buyers rejecting candidates for their job openings; Providers declining interview invitations from buyers; Providers cancelling their applications to jobs. These changes should more accurately reflect the most common reasons oDesk users would have to terminate candidacies. However, if none of the new reasons is exactly what you’re looking for, we are also allowing users to specify their own reasons as free-form text. Further more, in our attempt to combat Spam applications to job openings, we are introducing the “Flag as Spam” button so buyers can, with one-click, reject the undesired candidate. Providers with a high percentage of applications flagged as Spam will be investigated by oDesk and may face disciplinary actions. Read Full Article

Opinion: How to write a cover letter

July 23, 2008 by

The first impression you leave on a potential employer when looking for work online is not your resume or user profile, but rather your cover letter.  Resumes and profiles are succinct listings of professional accomplishment, but don’t say much about an applicant’s personality, work ethic, interests and talents.  Therefore, a cover letter is your place to shine. A cover letter should ALWAYS accompany a resume or link to an online profile.  Lack of a cover letter leaves buyers with the impression that the applicant is lazy or that he or she isn’t really that interested in the position.  On the opposite side of the spectrum, endless cover letters that read like a provider’s autobiography are unlikely to be read in their entirety.  Employers are generally busy people, who don’t have time to comb through a long letter and pick out the few facts about an applicant that interest them. An applicant has an average of 20 seconds to wow an employer.  It is, therefore, the provider’s responsibility to completely read through a job description and respond to it with a letter that consolidates all of his or her professional training and experience relevant to the job.  The letter should also be used to answer any questions posed in the job listing.  A well written and pertinent cover letter demonstrates that an applicant has fully read and understood the job description and is confident of his or her ability to carry out the duties required of the position. Cover letters should be dynamic and specific to each job position and buyer.  They should also be as concise and a maximum of one page, although half a page is the recommended length.  Limiting paragraphs to one to four sentences also makes the cover letter easy for potential employers … Read Full Article

The Way We Work

Test Drive oDesk

July 23, 2008 by

oDesk is an exciting new paradigm that offers multiple advantages– remote, low-cost and low overhead work product without upfront outlay; a wealth of skilled contractors to select from; pay-for-performance; flexibility with a built-in background structure and real-time monitoring. However, with all these pluses, buyers are left with the same final hiring decision they have in any employment situation. New buyers and experts familiar with oDesk face the same question and the same challenge. The challenge. How can I be confident that I’m hiring the best person for the job at hand? Although  relevant for first time buyers and buyers seeking expertise in an area they have never hired for, any long term relationship is going to have the same initial trial period. I want to know not only that the people I hire are qualified, but also that they are going to fit my organization and the way I conduct business.. Examining provider profiles, portfolios and feedback is the suggested method, and for many jobs, this is sufficient. But  this may not be enough. There’s more to it than selecting a qualified person: Will this person work well with me? Will they meet my specific expectations, time constraints and budget? Will our relationship be effective and productive? The solution. There’s a way to test drive providers at oDesk with little risk. A way to answer the important questions and ease the worries that come with any new hire. And it can be key when filling a longterm position. The idea is simple. Post your Job and expectations normally, but when you find providers that have the qualifications necessary, hire them with limited hours and assign a portion of a project (or a smaller but similar project). You can create a small … Read Full Article

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Buzzworthy (July 2008)

July 20, 2008 by

As always, we’re paying close attention to the online buzz about oDesk. In the past few weeks, we’ve seen quite a few bloggers talk about their experience with oDesk and recommend it to others. We always appreciate it, and for our favorite posts of the month we show that appreciation with T-shirts. Thank you Greg W (blog), Pothi K (blog), and Ashwin I (blog)! The post we enjoyed most this month was from Vikki Pusong, a recent arrival to oDesk who does technical writing and blogging from the Philippines. In the blog that she devotes to tips and talk about freelancing, she gives an enthusiastic discussion of the values of oDesk, highlighting payment flexibility and reliability–and even generates a comment thread in which one of her very satisfied buyers drops by! If you’d like a free oDesk T-shirt, just send us a link to your most recent post or posts about oDesk to buzz@odesk.com. We give out up to five shirts a month, and we always mention our favorite post here, which is a pretty good way to put yourself in front of the oDesk community. Read Full Article

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Finding the Right Provider

July 20, 2008 by

It’s easy to find skilled workers on oDesk–post a job, check out providers’ profiles, interview. It really is that simple, but a few tricks can help you get more from our global network of nearly 100,000 remote workers. Feedback: The first thing you’ll do is check the provider’s feedback and work history, but don’t just count stars. Look at what your candidate’s impressive 4.5 score really means to you. How many people contributed to that rating? Everyone’s gotta start somewhere, but the length of their track records should matter. Were they short projects or long? A ten-hour job is one thing, but longer assignments reveal the ability to handle complex jobs, manage relationships and deliver consistently, so weigh feedback on that 200-hour project more heavily. Are they getting repeat business? Seeing the same buyer IDs come back is a stronger recommendation than the highest written praise. What about ongoing projects? If the provider has a lot of continuing jobs, check whether she’ll have time to meet your deadlines. But be encouraged when a provider is still engaged in a project after logging 400 hours: She’s proven herself indispensable. What kind of jobs are listed? Your prospective Java developer lists a full alphabet soup of skills: ActiveX, CSS, J2EE, PHP, the works. If most of his projects have been in PHP and CSS, even dazzling feedback might not qualify him for your six-month J2EE project. Portfolio: Feedback lets you see whether a provider’s work made the buyer happy. The portfolio lets you see whether their work makes you happy. Is it good enough? Do you like your prospective writer’s “voice”? Do you find that prospective web designer’s last site attractive and easily navigable? Is it big enough? Does the portfolio contain work of the scope … Read Full Article

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Finding the Right Buyer

July 20, 2008 by

You’ve mastered the basics: You’ve maximized your provider profile by listing your skills, posting a portrait, taking all the relevant skills tests, and filling your portfolio with your finest work. You’re applying for jobs, but maybe you’re spending more time applying than you are interviewing. Maybe you’d like to lower the ratio between jobs you apply for and jobs you get. Maybe you’d like to minimize the occasional bad relationship–the buyer who changes terms, makes unreasonable demands, turns out to have no communications skills whatsoever. Job postings on oDesk aren’t like a newspaper classified or on some sketchy job board–there’s a lot more data that can help you spot serious buyers, figure out where to focus your resources, and to enjoy the work that you get. What is the job? Carefully read the job description and what’s between the lines: is it well thought out and thorough? Do I believe that the buyer is a good communicator? Will she clearly outline tasks? Does the buyer come across as professional and will not “leave me hanging”? Is the job in an industry that is rife with fraud (e.g. porn or gambling?). If it’s in such an industry, can I find the company name and website? Who are those people? Scope out the competition–who has already applied? If the buyer has been initiating contacts, those providers may have the inside track. Either way, check out the skills, feedback and pay rate of your competition. If you don’t think your profile stands comfortably against those who have already applied, you might prioritize responding to postings where you’ll be better positioned. Who gets the job? On past listings with multiple candidates, did the buyer go with the cheapest or the most qualified? For the new listing, which … Read Full Article

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Success Stories: Tarun Verma of Sun Softwares

July 20, 2008 by

India’s Sun Softwares does graphic design and web development. It started with one person in 2003 and now employs 20. Owner and CEO Tarun Verma credits a lot of that growth to oDesk. Sun signed up as an oDesk provider in July 2006, but Verma says his company didn’t start using oDesk effectively until the following January. Today, about 60 percent of Sun Softwares’ work comes via oDesk buyers. Q: It’s important for a provider to find a client he or she can work well with. Besides looking for a project that fits Sun Softwares’ expertise, what do you look for when you see a job post? A: We try to look for projects that are required to be built from scratch using the latest technology, and we look at the client’s comments in the job postings. At times we see some harsh comments in the job post, and we tend to ignore those posts, as there are high chances of project failure due to the client’s attitude. Some job posts call only for bug fixing–we ignore them, as it’s difficult to take those projects to completion which are already in some kind of mess. We pursue the full projects and the projects with complete specifications. The projects which are posted with complete specifications show that the buyer is really keen and would be very good to work with, as the scope has been clearly defined. Q: When you interview with a first-time client, how do you make sure you’re understanding the project requirements and the buyer’s needs? A: We try to get detailed specifications from the buyer, URLs of example websites, wire diagrams of screens, expected time for completion, expected budget. If the client does not provide the complete details, … Read Full Article

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Message Center now available in beta

July 1, 2008 by

We are pleased to announce the Beta launch of the oDesk Message Center! This is just one of many features we are launching to improve our communications capabilities, both from us to you and between you and other oDesk users. What is the Message Center? The Message Center is an email-like interface that captures messages generated by oDesk or oDesk users within the system. Messages are divided into 3 tabs: The Account Alerts tab contains message with direct or indirect financial implications. Examples include hiring actions (hire confirmations, raise rates) as well as payment-related messages (e.g. payment and withdrawal confirmation, payment methods changes) The Updates tab contains other system messages, with no direct financial implications The Tickets tab will contain discussions with the oDesk support team – no more fishing through your email to find our response to your support inquiry! Will I still get oDesk messages via email? For now, yes — all messages from oDesk will continue to be sent to your email account. But we are working on Message Center Preferences, which will allow you to configure which message types you receive in your email, your Message Center, both, or not at all. By enabling you to opt out of certain message types, the Message Center will help reduce your email load from oDesk and help you focus only on the highest-priority messages that truly demand your attention. Will my messages “expire” from the Message Center? For now, no, but once we have Message Center Preferences, we will likely delete Message Center messages after some period of time. You will always have the option to receive messages via email that you want to make sure you permanently keep. What else is coming? The next big thing is the “Inbox”, which will contain messaages from other oDesk users. The … Read Full Article

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Buzzworthy (June 2008)

June 20, 2008 by

We’ve begun passing out T-shirts to our favorite blog or forum posts mentioning oDesk. This month’s winners are: Aleh S for writing the aptly named blog post “…because oDesk is better!“. Teodolfo L for being “Addicted To Online Income Opportunities“. Jennifer W for chronicling her “Journey to Freedom“. Paul K for discussing the advantages of using oDesk for buyer and provider companies. Lawrence S for providing my favorite quote of the month: “What I like about oDesk is the elimination of payment issues – on both sides. If youíve read anything at all about freelancing online, the over riding issue always seem to be getting paid… oDesk has all but eliminated those types of problems.” Remember – if you haven’t gotten your T-shirt, send your latest blog or forum posts mentioning oDesk to buzz@odesk.com! … Read Full Article

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Success Stories: Jan Zands of Phonesheet.com

June 20, 2008 by

The Vision: In 1996, Jan Zands was answering phones at a Hollywood studio, trying to manage the high volume of incoming and outgoing calls with paper and pen–an overwhelming challenge. “A film producer will make about 40 calls per day and receive another 40 per day — and in Hollywood, a lot of people don’t return calls,” Zands explains. “It’s necessary to have a good system for tracking calls and what they are about, but at the time no such software existed — I saw an opportunity that a lot of other companies could benefit from as well.” Zands saw a way to build something better, and went into business building and installing FileMaker databases to handle call tracking. He soon realized that this was a cumbersome and expensive proposition for users. ìI needed to make it into a web-based application”, he said. The Problem: Good programmers are hard to find. Starting in 2001, Zands tried newspaper ads and Craigslist postings, then costly consulting firms and Internet-based offshore companies. Repeatedly he’d hire programmers who seemed reliable, but would end up leaving their work incomplete. “My biggest challenge was finding programmers that were affordable, but also skilled enough to finish the entire job,” Zands said. “I was wading around in the ocean of providers for over five years until I found oDesk.” The Solution: He found oDesk in April last year. “I went on oDesk and it was awesome! I posted my job and got about 20 responses within a day,” he said. “I was able to find people at the rate I needed and was also able to look at testimonials so I was certain that these people would finish the job.” That helped eliminate the biggest frustration he’d been experiencing. Read Full Article

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oDesk Perspective: Are you oDesk Ready?

June 20, 2008 by

Most oDesk assignments start small–you’re hired to complete specific projects. But when you prove to buyers they can rely on you, they start giving you more hours and increasingly vital tasks. Soon you may find yourself fully integrated with their in-house staff, and that begins to change the relationship between buyer and provider. We’ve been there–oDesk hires providers to work with our in-house staff, and on some projects, one type of worker is virtually indistinguishable from the other (click here to read more about Team oDesk). When you’re hired to, say, write a discrete piece of code, the buyer may not care when you do the work–as long as the Work Diary and memos look good, and you get good code submitted on time. But when you’re needed for more real-time collaboration, you have to reach an agreement to be available during some or all of the buyer’s business hours. But how will you be available? Is IM enough? Do you need to have a Skype account? A webcam? When you’re out, will you leave an away message telling the team what time you’ll be back? Will the buyer’s in-house staffers do the same? If you are a freelance professional, the buyer trusts you to work around your daily life. Maybe you don’t log on until after midnight, or frequently suspend sessions to handle family needs. But once you’ve agreed to be available at set times, you must take extra steps to create a distraction-free work environment, just like the “in-house” telecommuter opting for a home office instead of a cubicle. Flexible freelancers are masters of clever workarounds, but as the team becomes more interdependent, everyone needs to understand that expectations evolve. Integrating yourself into the buyer company’s daily workflow … Read Full Article

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oDesk Perspective: Integrating Virtual Staff

June 20, 2008 by

Most oDesk assignments start small–you hire a provider to complete a specific project. But when the provider proves he can be relied upon, you start giving him more hours and increasingly vital tasks. Soon you may find your remote provider fully integrated with your in-house staff, and that begins to change the relationship between buyer and provider. We know–here at oDesk we hire providers to work with our in-house staff, and on some projects, one type of worker is virtually indistinguishable from the other (click here to read more about Team oDesk). Add to the mix workplace flexibility that allows traditional employees to telecommute instead of coming to the office each day and you’ve got a team requiring an entirely new set of management skills. Here are a few lessons we’ve learned on the job. When you hire a provider to, say, write a discrete piece of code, you may not care when he does the work–as long as the Work Diary and memos look good, and you get good code on time. But when you need more real-time collaboration, you have to reach an agreement for the provider to be available during some or all of your business hours. But how will he be available? Is IM enough? Does he need to have a Skype account? A webcam? When he’s out, will he leave an away message telling you what time he’ll be back? Will your in-house staffers do the same? You trust your provider to work around his daily life. Maybe he doesn’t log on until after midnight, or frequently suspends sessions to handle family needs. Once he’s agreed to be available at set times, you have as much right to make sure he’ll have a distraction-free work … Read Full Article

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oDesk Secures $15 Million In Series C Funding

June 3, 2008 by

This morning we announced some exciting news. oDesk has raised $15 million in a round of financing led by DAG Ventures. Our existing investors – Benchmark Capital, Globespan Capital Partners and Sigma Partners- also participated in the round. We’re excited to welcome DAG Ventures into the oDesk family and we’re delighted that our existing investors were eager to invest again. oDesk is growing faster than we ever have before as more and more companies use our service to build and manage global teams.   In addition to bringing the team in Menlo Park together for a fantastic buffet of celebratory Costco pizza, ribs, and cheesecake, having the extra cash gives us more flexibility to move even faster toward our vision of changing the way the world works.  Plus, DAG has been a pleasure to work with. Read the press release here. Read Full Article

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oDesk Readiness is now public and required to apply to jobs

June 3, 2008 by

As promised, we have launched the second phase of the oDesk Readiness Test. This means buyers are now be able to explicitly search for and find oDesk Ready providers in provider search. Providers’ oDesk Readiness will also be displayed as part of their public profiles. We are also going to enforce provider oDesk Readiness by setting the job application quotas for all providers who are not yet oDesk Ready to ZERO. Therefore, all freelancers, company managers, and affiliated contractors on oDesk will have to become oDesk Ready before they can apply to any more jobs. If you have any concerns or suggestions please post your feedback here, http://www.odesk.com/community/node/3572. Read Full Article

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Include Remittance Info with Wire Transfers

May 28, 2008 by

We are happy to announce what is a small but important feature requested by managers of provider companies. Some banks in our top provider countries like Ukraine and India require a memo along with a wire that helps provide some information about the payment, titled “remittance information”. As requested, the wire transfer option in the withdrawals page now includes an optional field called “Remittance Information”. This field takes 35 characters, will be included with the transfer, and should appear in your bank statement. Read Full Article

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Provider Search now defaults to “Titles Only”

May 27, 2008 by

In order to improve the relevance of provider search results, we’ve decided to set “Search titles only” as checked by default. So for example, if you search by the keyword “Java”, the default provider search results will only return those providers who have opted to include “Java” in their titles. Of course, you can always widen your search by unchecking the “Search titles only” checkbox. Read Full Article

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Success Story: Stuart Hibbert / icomplete.com

May 22, 2008 by

Stuart Hibbert from icomplete was kind enough to interview with oDesk and share some of his insights into how to successfully use oDesk as a buyer. His interview was included in a recent oDesk newsletter. Based in Swindon, England, icomplete.com was conceived by three founders who, after many years of running successful small businesses, wanted to pass on their knowledge to help other companies improve their image, save time, and increase profits. Their Software-as-a-Service Business Suite incorporates CRM (contact management), calendar, task management, collaboration tools, telephony and website widgets, plus real-life personal assistants to answer calls and undertake tasks clients don’t have time or expertise to do themselves. The beta version is due out soon, to be followed by the commercial launch in the United Kingdom – starting at just £25 ($50) per month – there are no upfront costs, or contract tie-ins. An advertising-supported ‘free’ version will also be available worldwide (minus some of the enhanced features). CEO Stuart Hibbert is responsible for the day-to-day running of the business and specifically the product and technical teams. “Ultimately,” he says, “the buck stops with me.” As an oDesk buyer: Hibbert has been using oDesk for nearly a year, hiring developers within several disciplines; Java, AJAX (JavaScript) and Asterisk; as well as product testing and technical writing. “We started off with just a couple of Java developers back in June 2007,” he says. “We wanted to understand how outsourcing would work for us and which service best suited our requirements. We initially worked with two remote management services, but we liked oDesk so much that we moved those developers over to oDesk too. Our team is now nine providers strong. We tend to have a regular stable of providers – however, for certain skills we do … Read Full Article

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Market your company with the new Company Profile

May 20, 2008 by

As a company manager, you now have a lot more control over how your company is seen by potential oDesk partners. The biggest change is for Provider Companies: – You can set a company “tagline” and full description, in HTML – You can more easily upload your company logo – We show more statistics about your company – We show your company managers and up to 10 Affiliated Contractors, so your potential buyers can see who they will be working with See a sample here: Any team member with Admin privileges may edit your tagline, description, and logo on the Team Admn -> Team/Company Info tab (link) Buyers: Now you can market yourself as well Buyers, you can now display your company name, logo, tagline and description in each of your job openings. The setting applies to all of your job openings. It is of course completely optional, and the default setting is complete buyer anonymity. Read Full Article

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Are you ready to work on oDesk? Take the oDesk Readiness Test

May 20, 2008 by

We’ve just launched the oDesk Readiness Test for providers. It is a brief tutorial, designed to educate new providers on oDesk policies and best practices. Providers who have recently billed hours on oDesk are by definition ready to work and will be granted the “oDesk Ready” designation without having to pass the oDesk Readiness Test. The oDesk Readiness Test has the following specifications: 25 multiple choice questions Open book 90% correct to pass Should take less than 30 minutes to complete Test topics include: Following oDesk Policies Getting Hired Working on Assignments In two weeks, only providers who are oDesk Ready will be able to apply to jobs. Therefore, we highly recommend all providers who are not yet oDesk Ready to take the oDesk Readiness Test before June 4th. Read Full Article